Awesome Things You Can Learn From Old Indian Cities That Changed Their Name

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At the point when individuals we know change their names, it is regularly hard to adjust. Be that as it may, when cities change their names, they change their people s’ identities.

Here’s a brisk flashback of some cities that rechristened themselves. If it’s not too much trouble note, there are more than 100 urban areas and towns that have been renamed after Indian autonomy in 1947. We’ve chosen a modest bunch.

Do you live in any of them?

1. Trichinapoly to Tiruchirapalli

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In 1971, Tamil Nadu’s Trichy, as it is affectionately called, moved to a more Indian name for itself. It is generally trusted that the name is gotten from three-headed evil spirit Trishira.

2. Baroda to Vadodara

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Gujarat’s Baroda backpedaled to distinguishing itself as Vadodara in 1974. Vadodara gets its name from Vatpatrak or the leaf of Banyan tree and Vatodar or the core of the Banyan Tree.

3. Trivandrum to Thiruvananthapuram

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While a great many people still say Trivandrum (more for comfort, less for wistfulness), the capital of Kerala has been called Thiruvananthapuram from the year 1991. The name can be separated in Malayalam as Thiru-anantha-puram or the city of Lord Anantha, who is the central god at the now acclaimed Sri Padmanabhaswamy Temple.

4. Bombay to Mumbai

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As it’s been said, “Mumbai is a city, Bombay is an inclination.” The budgetary capital of India got its new name in 1996. The name is a mix of the words Mumba (Maha Amba) or Goddess Mumbadevi and Aayi or ‘mother’ in Marathi.

5. Madras to Chennai

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The most radical of all name changes, Madras progressed toward becoming Chennai in 1996. ‘Madras’ was a pioneer variant of Madraspattinam, an angling town in current Chennai. With respect to the birthplaces of the word ‘Chennai’, there are numerous clarifications. Some say the city is named after Telugu ruler Damarla Chennappa Nayakudu, others trust the name originates from Chenna Kesava Perumal sanctuary.

6. Cochin to Kochi

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A less anglicized adaptation of Cochin, Kerala’s port city Kochi appeared in 1996 also. Regularly called by its territory name, Ernakulam, Kochi gets its charming name from kochu azh I which signifies ‘little tidal pond’ in Malayalam.

7. Calcutta to Kolkata

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The nation’s way of life center, Calcutta or ‘Cal’ embraced its Bengali name Kolkata authoritatively in 2001. ‘Kolkata’ is a shorter rendition of Kolikata, which is the name of one of the three towns that existed in the area before the British assumed control India. The other two were called Sutanuti and Govindapur.

8. Pondicherry to Puducherry

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The interesting minimal French city of Pondicherry got another name in 2006. Otherwise called ‘Pondy’, its name in Tamil, Puducherry, actually signifies ‘new town’.

9. Cawnpore to Kanpur

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Arranged on the Ganges, the modern city of ‘Cawnpore’ experienced an official name change inside a time of Independence. There are two speculations for the inception of its name, one being that it is the city of Karna from Mahabharata (Karnapur) and alternate recommends that it is designed according to the name of adjacent town Makanpur.

10. Belgaum to Belagavi

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One of the 12 name changes that occurred inside this month, the Karnataka city of Belgaum is currently authoritatively called Belagavi. Its name begins from Sanskrit word Velugrama or ‘bamboo town’. The declaration of the name change was not met with well in the city and a ‘Kala Din’ was seen as an indication of dissent.

11. Indhur to Indore

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Indore experienced a name change amid the British run the show. The Madhya Pradesh city is named after its Indreshwar Temple, where ruler Indra is the managing god.

12. Panjim to Panaji

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Goa’s capital, Panaji authoritatively disengaged itself from its Portuguese name Panjim in the 1960s. Curiously, the city is called Ponnje in Konkani. Every one of the three words are gotten from Sanskrit words panjani and khali that signify ‘a pontoon’ and ‘a little stream’ separately. Able, would it say it isn’t?

13. Poona to Pune

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Bombay’s cousin city Pune went from being called Poona in 1977. Truly meant ‘city of uprightness’ Pune gets its name from punya giri . The most established reference of the city’s name was found on a copper plate going back to the Rashtrakuta Dynasty from 937 CE where it was called Punya Vishaya.

14. Simla to Shimla

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The capital of Himachal Pradesh now, Simla used to be the late spring capital of the British amid their run the show. Gotten from the name of Goddess Shyamala Devi, a rebirth of Ma Kali, Shimla embraced its Indian spelling directly after Independence.

15. Benares to Varanasi

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Otherwise called the heavenly city of Kashi, UP’s Varanasi recovered its ‘Indian’ name in 1956. The name of the city presumably begins from two waterways, Varuna, that keeps on streaming in the city, and Asi, a stream close Assi Ghat. The Ridveda notices the city as Kasi or Kashi.

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