‘Chuddies’ evolve into current Indian word to come in Oxford English Dictionary

Oxford Dictionary - ‘Chuddies’ evolve into current Indian word to come in Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford Dictionary - ‘Chuddies’ evolve into current Indian word to come in Oxford English Dictionary
FILE – In this March 14, 2007 file photo, a man reads a copy of the Oxford Dictionary of English. Oxford Dictionaries is recognizing the power of the millennial generation with its 2017 word of the year: youthquake. Oxford lexicographers say there was a fivefold increase in use of the term between 2016 and 2017. It is defined as “a significant cultural, political, or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people.” (Ian Nicholson/PA via AP, File)

The word, ‘chuddies’ has added in various journal and publications at the time of British rule but came into eminence after a television show on BBC which came in mid-1990. It has been contained in the current amend of the Oxford dictionary.

‘Chuddies’ which means underpants is the most recent Indian word to come in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), which has integrated many such words from the sub-continent that give back the great confrontation among India and Britain over the centuries.

The word has figured in several gazettes and publications at the time of British rule, but came into existence when it was used in the famous British-Asian comedy series ‘Goodness Gracious Me’ on BBC television in the mid-1990s.

Used as the Asian similarly of ‘kiss my a**e’, actor Sanjeev Bhaskar used the idiom: ‘kiss my chuddies’, which became famous and came into the prevailing dissertation. Bhaskar acted as one of two characters known as ‘Bhangra Muffins’ in the array, the other actor was Kulvinder Gheer.

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Jonathan Dent, who was the senior assistant editor at OED, says: Their inclusion of British Indian cudtom gets an amendment with the inclusion of the proud kiss my chuddies (underpants), got famous as a motto by actor and writer Sanjeev Bhaskar”.

The Oxford English Dictionary way in to a place characterize the word history of ‘chuddies’ and adds: ‘Short trousers, shorts. Now commonly: underwear; underpants. British colloquial kiss my chuddies and variants: used as an expression of release, refusal, or indifference; cf. kiss my a**e’.

The dictionary acknowledge its first use in the Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine in 1858 and in the 1885 Gazetteer Bombay Presidency: “The men wear a pair of short light drawers of chuddies embracing to the knee.”

The March amend to the dictionary contains 650 current words, expression and senses.

The quarterly amend freed this week contains some recent entries and senses formulated in reply to the first couple of these appeals containing the Words Where You Are request for provincial vocabulary and the Hobby Words appeal for words related with specific pastimes.

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Between provincial products, contains jibbons, a name in Welsh English for the vegetable now commonly called in England as spring onions.

The general appeal also produced a host of Scots terms, containing bidie-in, which the OED explains as a person who lives with his or her partner in a non-marital relation, and bigsie, which defines having an embellished sense of one’s own significance. Many Indian words listed the English lexicon over the centuries and are in use in daily discourse. ‘Hobson-Jobson’, a glossary written in 1886, contained as many as 2000 entries of words and terms from Indian languages at the time of the British rule.

Some of the commonly used words of Indian etymology are: loot, bungalow, avatar, mantra, chutney, cot, dacoit, dungaree, juggernaut, guru, pundit, khaki, jungle, nirvana, pukka, pyjamas, veranda, maharajah and punch.

 

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